Quarterly report pursuant to Section 13 or 15(d)

Organization and Basis of Presentation

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Organization and Basis of Presentation
9 Months Ended
Mar. 31, 2017
Organization and Basis of Presentation [Abstract]  
ORGANIZATION AND BASIS OF PRESENTATION
NOTE 1   ORGANIZATION AND BASIS OF PRESENTATION

 

Business Description and Presentation

 

Provision Holding, Inc. (“Provision” or the “Company”) focused on the development and distribution of Provision’s patented three-dimensional, holographic interactive displays focused at grabbing and holding consumer attention particularly and initially in the advertising and product merchandising markets. The systems display a moving 3D image size to forty inches in front of the display, projecting a digital video image out into space detached from any screen, rendering truly independent floating images featuring high definition and crisp visibility from far distances. The nearest comparable to this technology can be seen in motion pictures such as Star Wars and Minority Report, where objects and humans are represented through full-motion holograms.

 

Provision’s proprietary and patented display technologies and software, and innovative solutions aim to attract consumer attention. Currently the Company has multiple contracts to place Provision’s products into large retail stores, as well as signed agreements with advertising agents to sell ad space to Fortune 500 customers. Given the technology’s potential in the advertising market, the Company is focused on creating recurring revenue streams from the sale of advertising space on each unit.

 

Corporate History

 

On February 14, 2008, MailTec, Inc. (now known as Provision Holding, Inc.) (the “Company”) entered into an Agreement and Plan of Merger, which was amended and restated on February 27, 2008 (as amended and restated, the “Agreement”), and closed effective February 28, 2008, with ProVision Merger Corp., a Nevada corporation and wholly owned subsidiary of the Company (the “Subsidiary”) and Provision Interactive Technologies, Inc., a California corporation (“Provision”). Pursuant to the Agreement, the Subsidiary merged into Provision, and Provision became a wholly owned subsidiary of the Company. As consideration for the merger of the Subsidiary into Provision, the Company issued 20,879,350 shares of the Company’s common stock to the shareholders, creditors, and certain warrant holders of Provision, representing approximately 86.5% of the Company’s aggregate issued and outstanding common stock, and the outstanding shares and debt, and those warrants whose holders received shares of the Company’s common stock, of Provision were transferred to the Company and cancelled.

 

Going Concern and Management Plans

 

These unaudited condensed consolidated financial statements are presented on the basis that the Company is a going concern. Going concern contemplates the realization of assets and the satisfaction of liabilities in the normal course of business over a reasonable length of time. The Company had accumulated deficit at March 31, 2017 of $39,914,671. The Company has negative working capital of $11,446,531 as of March 31, 2017. These matters raise substantial doubt about the Company’s ability to continue as a going concern. The unaudited condensed consolidated financial statements do not include any adjustments relating to the recoverability and classification of recorded asset amounts or the amounts and classification of liabilities that might be necessary should the Company be unable to continue as a going concern. The Company's continuation as a going concern is dependent upon its ability to generate sufficient cash flow to meet its obligations on a timely basis, to obtain additional financing or refinancing as may be required and, ultimately, to attain profitable operations. Management’s plan to eliminate the going concern situation include, but are not limited to, the raise of additional capital through issuance of debt and equity, improved cash flow management, aggressive cost reductions, and the creation of additional sales and profits across its product lines.

 

Basis of presentation

 

Throughout this report, the terms “we”, “us”, “ours”, “Provision” and “company” refer to Provision Holding, Inc., including its wholly-owned subsidiary. The condensed consolidated balance sheet presented as of June 30, 2016 has been derived from the Company’s audited consolidated financial statements. The unaudited condensed consolidated financial statements have been prepared pursuant to the rules and regulations of the Securities and Exchange Commission, (instructions to Form 10-Q and Article 8 of Regulation S-X). Certain information and footnote disclosures normally included in the annual financial statements prepared in accordance with accounting principles generally accepted in the United States of America, have been omitted pursuant to those rules and regulations, but we believe that the disclosures are adequate to make the information presented not misleading. The unaudited condensed consolidated financial statements and notes included herein should be read in conjunction with the annual financial statements and notes for the fiscal year ended June 30, 2016 included in Provision’s Annual Report on Form 10-K filed with the SEC on October 13, 2016. In the opinion of management, all adjustments, consisting of normal, recurring adjustments and disclosures necessary for a fair presentation of these interim statements have been included. The results of operations for the three and nine month period ended March 31, 2017 are not necessarily indicative of the results for the fiscal year ending June 30, 2017.

 

Principles of Consolidation and Reporting

 

The consolidated financial statements include the financial statements of the Company and its wholly owned subsidiary. All significant inter-company balances and transactions have been eliminated in consolidation. The Company uses a fiscal year end of June 30.

 

There have been no significant changes in the Company's significant accounting policies during the three and nine months ended March 31, 2017 compared to what was previously disclosed in the Company's Annual Report on Form 10-K for the fiscal year ended June 30, 2016.

 

Basis of comparison

 

Certain prior-period amounts have been reclassified to conform to the current period presentation.

 

Use of Estimates

 

The preparation of financial statements in conformity with accounting principles generally accepted in the United States of America requires management to make certain estimates and assumptions that affect the reported amounts and timing of revenues and expenses, the reported amounts and classification of assets and liabilities, and the disclosure of contingent assets and liabilities. These estimates and assumptions are based on the Company’s historical results as well as management’s future expectations. The Company’s actual results could vary materially from management’s estimates and assumptions.

 

Management makes estimates that affect certain accounts including, deferred income tax assets, estimated useful lives of property and equipment, accrued expenses, fair value of equity instruments and reserves for any other commitments or contingencies. Any adjustments applied to estimates are recognized in the year in which such adjustments are determined.

 

Cash and Cash Equivalents

 

The Company considers all highly liquid investments, with an original maturity of three months or less when purchased, to be cash equivalents. As of March 31, 2017 and June 30, 2016, the Company’s cash and cash equivalents were on deposit in federally insured financial institutions, and at times may exceed federally insured limits.

 

Accounts Receivable

 

Accounts receivable are not collateralized and interest is not accrued on past due accounts. Periodically, management reviews the adequacy of its provision for doubtful accounts based on historical bad debt expense results and current economic conditions using factors based on the aging of its accounts receivable. After management has exhausted all collection efforts, management writes off receivables and the related reserve. Additionally, the Company may identify additional allowance requirements based on indications that a specific customer may be experiencing financial difficulties. Actual bad debt results could differ materially from these estimates.

 

Inventories

 

Inventories are stated at the lower of cost (first-in, first-out) or market. The Company periodically reviews its inventories for indications of slow movement and obsolescence and records an allowance when it is deemed necessary.

 

Property and Equipment

 

Property and equipment are stated at cost. When retired or otherwise disposed, the related carrying value and accumulated depreciation are removed from the respective accounts and the net difference less any amount realized from disposition, is reflected in earnings. For financial statement purposes, property and equipment are recorded at cost and depreciated using the straight-line method over their estimated useful lives. Long-lived tangible assets are reviewed for impairment whenever events or changes in business circumstances indicate the carrying value of the assets may not be recoverable. Impairment losses are recognized based on estimated fair values if the sum of expected future undiscounted cash flows of the related assets is less than their carrying values.

 

Intangibles

 

Intangibles represent primarily costs incurred in connection with patent applications. Such costs are amortized using the straight-line method over the useful life of the patent once issued, or expensed immediately if any specific application is unsuccessful.

 

Revenue Recognition

 

The Company recognizes gross sales when persuasive evidence of an arrangement exists, title transfer has occurred, the price is fixed or readily determinable, and collection is probable. It recognizes revenue in accordance with Accounting Standards Codification (“ASC”) 605, Revenue Recognition (“ASC 605”). Revenue from licensing, distribution and marketing agreements is recognized over the term of the contract. Revenue from the sale of hardware is recognized when the product is complete and the buyer has accepted delivery. Provisions for discounts and rebates to customers, estimated returns and allowances, and other adjustments are provided for in the same period the related sales are recorded.

 

Cost of Revenue

 

Cost of revenue in respect to sale of hardware consists of costs associated with manufacturing of 3D displays, Kiosk machine, transportation, and other costs that are directly related to a revenue-generating. Such expenses are classified as cost of revenue in the corresponding period in which the revenue is recognized in the accompanying income statement.

 

Depreciation and Amortization

 

The Company depreciates its property and equipment using the straight-line method with estimated useful lives from three to seven years. For federal income tax purposes, depreciation is computed using an accelerated method.

 

Shipping and Handling Costs

 

The Company’s policy is to classify shipping and handling costs as a component of Costs of Revenues in the Statement of Operations.

 

Unearned Revenue

 

The Company bills customers in advance for certain of its services. If the customer makes payment before the service is rendered to the customer, the Company records the payment in a liability account entitled customer prepayments and recognizes the revenue related to the services when the customer receives and utilizes that service, at which time the earnings process is complete. The Company recorded $2,057,607 and $3,419,616 as of March 31, 2017 and June 30, 2016, respectively as deferred revenue.

 

Significant Customers

 

During the three ended March 31, 2017 the Company had one customer which accounted for more than 10% of the Company’s revenues (94%). During the nine months ended March 31, 2017 the Company had two customers which accounted for more than 10% of the Company’s revenues (74% and 19%). During the three and nine months ended March 31, 2016 the Company had one customer which accounted for more than 10% of the Company’s revenues (99% and 99%, respectively).  

 

Research and Development Costs

 

The Company charges all research and development costs to expense when incurred. Manufacturing costs associated with the development of a new process or a new product are expensed until such times as these processes or products are proven through final testing and initial acceptance by the customer.

 

For the three months ended March 31, 2017 and 2016, the Company incurred $37,934 and $119,407, respectively for research and development expense which are included in the unaudited condensed consolidated statements of operations. For the nine months ended March 31, 2017 and 2016, the Company incurred $257,838 and $216,306, respectively for research and development expense which are included in the unaudited condensed consolidated statements of operations.

 

Fair Value of Financial Instruments

 

Fair value estimates discussed herein are based upon certain market assumptions and pertinent information available to management as of March 31, 2017 and June 30, 2016. The respective carrying value of certain on-balance-sheet financial instruments, approximate their fair values. These financial instruments include cash, accounts receivable, accounts payable, accrued expenses and notes payable. Fair values were assumed to approximate carrying values for these financial instruments because they are short term in nature and their carrying amounts approximate fair values or they are receivable or payable on demand.

 

The Company uses fair value measurements under the three-level valuation hierarchy for disclosures of fair value measurement and enhances disclosure for fair value measures. The three levels are defined as follows:

 

  Level 1 inputs to the valuation methodology are quoted prices (unadjusted) for identical assets or liabilities in active markets.

 

  Level 2 inputs to the valuation methodology include quoted prices for similar assets and liabilities in active markets, and inputs that are observable for the assets or liability, either directly or indirectly, for substantially the full term of the financial instruments.

 

  Level 3 inputs to the valuation methodology are unobservable and significant to the fair value.

 

    Carrying     Fair Value Measurements 
Using Fair Value Hierarchy
 
    Value     Level 1     Level 2     Level 3  
Convertible notes (net of discount) – March 31, 2017   $ 6,568,572     $       -     $       -     $ 6,568,572  
Convertible notes (net of discount) – June 30, 2016   $ 6,415,371     $ -     $ -     $ 6,415,371  
Derivative liability – March 31, 2017   $ 427,824     $ -     $ -     $ 427,824  
Derivative liability – June 30, 2016   $ 188,128     $ -     $ -     $ 188,128  

 

The following table provides a summary of the changes in fair value of the Company’s Promissory Notes, which are both Level 3 liabilities as of March 31, 2017:

 

Balance at June 30, 2016   $ 6,415,371  
Issuance of notes – net of discount     355,000  
Derivative liability on issuance of notes     (304,906 )
Accretion of debt and warrant discount and prepaid financing costs     1,483,437  
Issuance of shares of common stock for convertible debt     (1,380,330 )
Balance March 31, 2017   $ 6,568,572  

 

The Company determined the value of its convertible notes using a market interest rate and the value of the warrants and beneficial conversion feature issued at the time of the transaction less the accretion. There is no active market for the debt and the value was based on the delayed payment terms in addition to other facts and circumstances at the end of March 31, 2017 and June 30, 2016. 

 

Derivative Financial Instruments

 

The Company evaluates our financial instruments to determine if such instruments are derivatives or contain features that qualify as embedded derivatives. For derivative financial instruments that are accounted for as liabilities, the derivative instrument is initially recorded at its fair value and is then re-valued at each reporting date, with changes in the fair value reported in the statements of operations. For stock-based derivative financial instruments, the Company uses the Black-Scholes-Merton pricing model to value the derivative instruments. The classification of derivative instruments, including whether such instruments should be recorded as liabilities or as equity, is evaluated at the end of each reporting period. Derivative instrument liabilities are classified in the balance sheet as current or non-current based on whether or not net-cash settlement of the derivative instrument could be required within 12 months of the balance sheet date.

 

Certain of the Company’s embedded conversion features on debt and outstanding warrants are treated as derivative liabilities for accounting purposes under ASC 815 due to insufficient authorized shares to settle these outstanding contracts, or due to other rights connected with these contracts, such as registration rights. In the case of insufficient authorized share capital available to fully settle outstanding contracts, the Company utilizes the latest maturity date sequencing method to reclassify outstanding contracts as derivative instruments. These contracts are recognized currently in earnings until such time as the warrants are exercised, expire, the related rights have been waived and/or the authorized share capital has been amended to accommodate settlement of these contracts. These instruments do not trade in an active securities market.

 

The classification of derivative instruments, including whether such instruments should be recorded as liabilities or as equity, is re-assessed at the end of each reporting period. Derivative instruments that become subject to reclassification are reclassified at the fair value of the instrument on the reclassification date. Derivative instrument liabilities will be classified in the balance sheet as current or non-current based on whether or not settlement of the derivative instrument is expected within 12 months of the balance sheet date. 

 

The Company estimates the fair value of these instruments using the Black-Scholes option pricing model and the intrinsic value if the convertible notes are due on demand.

 

We have determined that certain convertible debt instruments outstanding as of the date of these financial statements include an exercise price “reset” adjustment that qualifies as derivative financial instruments under the provisions of ASC 815-40, Derivatives and Hedging - Contracts in an Entity’s Own Stock (“ASC 815-40”). Certain of the convertible debentures have a variable exercise price, thus are convertible into an indeterminate number of shares for which we cannot determine if we have sufficient authorized shares to settle the transaction with. Accordingly, the embedded conversion option is a derivative liability and is marked to market through earnings at the end of each reporting period. Any change in fair value during the period recorded in earnings as “Other income (expense) - gain (loss) on change in derivative liabilities.”

 

The following table represents the Company’s derivative liability activity for the period ended:

Balance at June 30, 2016   $ 188,128  
Derivative liability reclass into additional paid in capital upon notes conversion     (125,710 )
Initial measurement at issuance date of the notes     409,240  
Change in fair value of derivative at period end     (43,834 )
Balance March 31, 2017   $ 427,824  

 

Commitments and Contingencies:

 

In the normal course of business, the Company is subject to loss contingencies, such as legal proceedings and claims arising out of its business, that cover a wide range of matters, including, among others, government investigations, environment liability and tax matters. An accrual for a loss contingency is recognized when it is probable that an asset had been impaired or a liability had been incurred and the amount of loss can be reasonably estimated.

 

Basic and Diluted Income (Loss) per Share

 

Basic income (loss) per common share is computed by dividing net income (loss) available to common stockholders by the weighted average number of common shares outstanding. Diluted income (loss) per common share is computed similar to basic income per common share except that the denominator is increased to include the number of additional common shares that would have been outstanding if the potential common shares had been issued and if the additional common shares were dilutive. As of March 31, 2017, the Company had debt instruments, options and warrants outstanding that can potentially be converted into approximately 116,907,345 shares of common stock.

 

Anti-dilutive securities not included in diluted loss per share relating to:      
Warrants outstanding     333,333  
Options vested and outstanding     -  
Convertible debt and notes payable including accrued interest     17,454,009  

 

Material Equity Instruments

 

The Company evaluates stock options, stock warrants and other contracts (convertible promissory note payable) to determine if those contracts or embedded components of those contracts qualify as derivative financial instruments to be separately accounted for under the relevant sections of ASC 815-40, Derivative Instruments and Hedging: Contracts in Entity’s Own Equity (“ASC 815”). The result of this accounting treatment could be that the fair value of a financial instrument is classified as a derivative financial instrument and is marked-to-market at each balance sheet date and recorded as a liability. In the event that the fair value is recorded as a liability, the change in fair value is recorded in the statement of operations as other income or other expense. Upon conversion or exercise of a derivative financial instrument, the instrument is marked to fair value at the conversion date and then that fair value is reclassified to equity. Financial instruments that are initially classified as equity that become subject to reclassification under ASC 815 are reclassified to a liability account at the fair value of the instrument on the reclassification date.

 

Certain of the Company’s embedded conversion features on debt and outstanding warrants are treated as derivative liabilities for accounting purposes under ASC 815-40 due to insufficient authorized shares to settle these outstanding contracts. Pursuant to SEC staff guidance that permits a sequencing approach based on the use of ASC 840-15-25 which provides guidance for contracts that permit partial net share settlement. The sequencing approach may be applied in one of two ways: contracts may be evaluated based on (1) earliest issuance date or (2) latest maturity date. In the case of insufficient authorized share capital available to fully settle outstanding contracts, the Company utilizes the earliest maturity date sequencing method to reclassify outstanding contracts as derivative instruments. These contracts are recognized currently in earnings until such time as the convertible notes or warrants are exercised, expire, the related rights have been waived and/or the authorized share capital has been amended to accommodate settlement of these contracts. These instruments do not trade in an active securities market.

 

Recent Accounting Pronouncements

 

In January 2016, the FASB issued an accounting standard update which requires, among other things, that entities measure equity investments (except those accounted for under the equity method of accounting or those that result in consolidation of the investee) at fair value, with changes in fair value recognized in earnings. Under the standard, entities will no longer be able to recognize unrealized holding gains and losses on equity securities classified today as available for sale as a component of other comprehensive income. For equity investments without readily determinable fair values the cost method of accounting is also eliminated, however subject to certain exceptions, entities will be able to elect to record equity investments without readily determinable fair values at cost, less impairment and plus or minus adjustments for observable price changes, with all such changes recognized in earnings. This new standard does not change the guidance for classifying and measuring investments in debt securities and loans. The standard is effective for us on July 1, 2018 (the first quarter of our 2019 fiscal year). The Company is currently evaluating the anticipated impact of this standard on our financial statements.

 

In February 2016, the FASB issued ASU No. 2016-02, Leases (Topic 842) to increase transparency and comparability among organizations by recognizing lease assets and lease liabilities on the balance sheet and disclosing key information about leasing arrangements. Topic 842 affects any entity that enters into a lease, with some specified scope exemptions. The guidance in this Update supersedes Topic 840, Leases. The core principle of Topic 842 is that a lessee should recognize the assets and liabilities that arise from leases. A lessee should recognize in the statement of financial position a liability to make lease payments (the lease liability) and a right-of-use asset representing its right to use the underlying asset for the lease term. For public companies, the amendments in this Update are effective for fiscal years beginning after December 15, 2018, including interim periods within those fiscal years. We are currently evaluating the impact of adopting ASU No. 2016-02 on our consolidated financial statements.

 

In March 2016, the FASB issued ASU 2016-08, Revenue from Contracts with Customers (Topic 606): Principal versus Agent Considerations (Reporting Revenue Gross versus Net) that clarifies how to apply revenue recognition guidance related to whether an entity is a principal or an agent. ASU 2016-08 clarifies that the analysis must focus on whether the entity has control of the goods or services before they are transferred to the customer and provides additional guidance about how to apply the control principle when services are provided and when goods or services are combined with other goods or services. The effective date for ASU 2016-08 is the same as the effective date of ASU 2014-09 as amended by ASU 2015-14for annual reporting periods beginning after December 15, 2017, including interim periods within those years. The Company has not yet determined the impact of ASU 2016-08 on its consolidated financial statements.

 

In March 2016, the FASB issued ASU No. 2016-09, Compensation – Stock Compensation, or ASU No. 2016-09. The areas for simplification in this Update involve several aspects of the accounting for share-based payment transactions, including the income tax consequences, classification of awards as either equity or liabilities, and classification on the statement of cash flows. For public entities, the amendments in this Update are effective for annual periods beginning after December 15, 2016, and interim periods within those annual periods. Early adoption is permitted in any interim or annual period. If an entity early adopts the amendments in an interim period, any adjustments should be reflected as of the beginning of the fiscal year that includes that interim period. An entity that elects early adoption must adopt all of the amendments in the same period. Amendments related to the timing of when excess tax benefits are recognized, minimum statutory withholding requirements, forfeitures, and intrinsic value should be applied using a modified retrospective transition method by means of a cumulative-effect adjustment to equity as of the beginning of the period in which the guidance is adopted. Amendments related to the presentation of employee taxes paid on the statement of cash flows when an employer withholds shares to meet the minimum statutory withholding requirement should be applied retrospectively. Amendments requiring recognition of excess tax benefits and tax deficiencies in the income statement and the practical expedient for estimating expected term should be applied prospectively. An entity may elect to apply the amendments related to the presentation of excess tax benefits on the statement of cash flows using either a prospective transition method or a retrospective transition method. We are currently evaluating the impact of adopting ASU No. 2016-09 on our consolidated financial statements.

 

In April 2016, the FASB issued ASU 2016-10, Revenue from Contracts with Customers (Topic 606): Identifying Performance Obligations and Licensing, which provides further guidance on identifying performance obligations and improves the operability and understandability of licensing implementation guidance. The effective date for ASU 2016-10 is the same as the effective date of ASU 2014-09 as amended by ASU 2015-14for annual reporting periods beginning after December 15, 2017, including interim periods within those years. The Company has not yet determined the impact of ASU 2016-10 on its consolidated financial statements.

 

In June 2016, the FASB Issued ASU 2016-12, “Revenue from Contracts with Customers (Topic 606): Narrow-Scope Improvements and Practical Expedients” and clarifies the objective of the collectability criterion, presentation of taxes collected from customers, non-cash consideration, contract modifications at transition, completed contracts at transition and how guidance in Topic 606 is retrospectively applied. The amendments do not change the core principle of the guidance in Topic 606. The effective dates are the same as those for Topic 606. The Company has not yet determined the impact of ASU 2016-12 on its consolidated financial statements.

 

In August 2016, the FASB issued ASU No. 2016-15, Statement of Cash Flows (Topic 230): Classification of Certain Cash Receipts and Cash Payments, in an effort to reduce the diversity of how certain cash receipts and cash payments are presented and classified in the statement of cash flows. The amendments of this ASU are effective for fiscal years beginning after December 15, 2017, and interim periods within those fiscal years. Early adoption is permitted. The Company has not yet determined the impact of ASU 2016-15 on its consolidated financial statements.

 

In October 2016, the FASB issued ASU No 2016-16 - Income Taxes: Intra-Entity Transfers of Assets Other Than Inventory. ASU 2016-16 will require the tax effects of intercompany transactions, other than sales of inventory, to be recognized currently, eliminating an exception under current GAAP in which the tax effects of intra-entity asset transfers are deferred until the transferred asset is sold to a third party or otherwise recovered through use. The guidance will be effective for the first interim period of our 2019 fiscal year, with early adoption permitted. The Company has not yet determined the impact of ASU 2016-16 on its consolidated financial statements.

 

In January 2017, FASB issued ASU No. 2017-01, Business Combinations (Topic 805): Clarifying the Definition of a Business, in an effort to clarify the definition of a business with the objective of adding guidance to assist entities with evaluating whether transactions should be accounted for as acquisitions (or disposals) of assets or businesses. The amendments of this ASU are effective for fiscal years beginning after December 15, 2017, and interim periods within those fiscal years. The Company has not yet determined the impact of ASU 2017-01 on its consolidated financial statements.